Tag Archives: Pinterest

What I learned on my summer vacation

5 Things I Learned On My Summer Vacation

I volunteer as a Board Member for the Redcliff Public Library.  We are a small library in a small town, but we’ve agreed that one of the important things that we need to do is to promote our library  on Social Media. Of course, there is no extra money to hire additional staff to perform this responsibility. And so, one of the tasks I’ve taken on, is handling the library’s social media campaigns. It has been a good experience, partnering with our Library Manager to promote our library through various social media channels*.

This summer I worked on 3 different campaigns promoting the library. While I’m rediscovering the wheel here; I think the wheel is the same shape regardless of the size of your audience/campaign. So, here are 5 things I’ve learned about using social media effectively.

#1 Organization is Key

If you’re not prepared to be organized about your social media you might as well not start any kind of social media campaign. The problem – many people (including myself at the start of this project) think of social media in terms of hanging out on Facebook and Twitter and playing on Pinterest. They don’t think of it as real work. If you’re going to do it right – it is real work and you need to get organized to do it. After running three social media campaigns for our library, I’m building a workflow and the tools to support that workflow. I also think about the workload differently now. Various campaigns may represent peak effort, but in order to keep the connection with our audience alive (see #3), we need to plan to stay active all the time.

#2 Know Your Audience

It seems so simple, of course you’ve got to know your audience. But really, who are you talking to? To get the best results for your effort on social media, be prepared to re-evaluate who your audience is. For example; initially on Twitter our follows were of other libraries and and book oriented accounts. But the longer this social media project goes on, the more our definition of our audience and our purpose for talking to them evolves. Currently, we see all social media channels as methods for connecting with our patrons. And by demonstrating our strong connections with our patrons, we are also using social media to influence our funding agencies.

#3 Silence is Golden – Except When it Isn’t

Don’t wait for your announcement/programs/promotion before you start to speak to your audience. The social media space is a busy place and people aren’t going to hang around watching to see if you’re about to say something.

Instead

#4 Give First

Bring value to the conversation with information that is useful and/or interesting to your conversation partners. This is good manners and good conversation in real life, and it works online too. Good value can be kitten pictures or local information. Targeting your audience will help you decide what information serves them best. I  won’t say the worst thing you can do is post random stuff, but random does make you appear less focused. It makes it harder for your desired audience to understand what you can do for them.  Take advantage of the analytics provided by the various social media channels. What posts are liked and shared? What tweets are viewed most often?

#5 Make Connections

Make connections with complementary organizations. Linking to partners also helps with the ever present problem (demand) for more content. It wasn’t until I started including information from the Town of Redcliff’s Programs and Events calendar; that I felt like our information stream started to achieve a natural flow. That is; we’re publishing lots of useful posts/tweets, without always harping on our particular program reminders and solicitations. Instead, “our stuff” is placed in an attractive context of useful information.  Connections have helped with content and those connections extend our reach by sharing and reposting  our content.

Have I figured everything out yet? Of course not, social media is a work in progress and so is how we use it.


Footnotes

* What do I mean by Social Media Channels. For now, for us, it is Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.
†By workflow, I mean creating a series of steps that will take an idea and create a series of posts, tweets etc to promote it. Very little of this is automated. My goal is to create a workflow that any volunteer could follow.
My tools include at this point: an Excel spreadsheet, an IFTTT account, Google Calendar, and a bit of Hootsuite. This article from Hootsuite started me thinking about how I wanted to design my own spreadsheet.