Tag Archives: workaround

Thursday – PowerPoint Links

I’ve just been working on a PowerPoint template for a Jeopardy style game. I inherited this template, and as frequently happens a little cleanup is necessary to ensure the PowerPoint template works as desired.

To help you visualize the problem – a picture of the game board

Jeopardy Game Board 1st slide
The Game Board

Each square hyperlinks to a separate slide with the question (and answer).

I felt there were a number of improvements I could do to make the presentation easier to use and maintain. I won’t go into every change today, but a couple of changes involved hyperlinks
(shortcut key Ctrl + K, if you are editing 25 hyperlinks, then the reason for using a shortcut key becomes obvious).

The first maintenance problem I ran into was that the previous designer had applied the hyperlink to both the shape AND the text on the shape (now there are 50 hyperlinks – if you are counting).

Button shape with text selected
Shape with text on top

They did this for a very good reason; that the text on a hyperlinked shape does not change state like normal hyperlink does (the state change shows if the link has been visited or not).

So if the slides the shapes are linked to are reordered or edited, the links have to be painstakingly tracked down and edited and since essentially the links are layered one on top of each other it is a real pain.

I had a better plan. Move the button shapes to the Slide Master (after creating a layout designed for the Game Board slide). Then insert text placeholders (yes, 25 of them) for the dollar values. Position the placeholders over each button. No hyperlinks here.

Now moving back to the Game Board slide in Normal View, I can hyperlink the text box. Text boxes behave differently from shapes, and do change state to show the link has been visited.

Another advantage of the text placeholder is that if the user inadvertently moves the text boxes, the Reset command will snap them back into position. (A definitely plus when editing 25 text boxes).

The other visual difficulty I had, was with the colours of the hyperlinks themselves. They didn’t have a strong contrast with my (new) button colour, and the visited colour was still (kinda) visible. I wanted a strong link colour and once visited I wanted the link to disappear. I could add animations, but why bother when I could solve both problems easily by changing the link colours in the Color Theme.

Theme Colour Panel PowerPoint 2016
Theme Colour Panel PowerPoint 2016

Here is the theme colour panel after I adjusted the Hyperlink and Followed Hyperlink Colours.

The colours in the theme were picked after playing with the free https://coolors.co/ app I also got some good advice from this article. The image at the top of the article is the colour palette created by the Coolors.co app – translated into RGB. I usually add this information as a layout in the slide master.


A little bit of history – lost … and found

Excel has been around for decades, so it isn’t surprising that there are many features tucked away under the hood. What is surprising is when a useful feature is lost and only careful archeology can bring it back to life.

Excel 4.0 had a rudimentary macro language, mostly using excel formula approaches to building functionality. This was replaced by the VBA programming language. But there are still useful little items tucked away in this early language that haven’t been replaced.

One of these is Get.Cell.

Get.Cell had a boatload of switches that allowed the user to pull information about the cell formatting and contents and most of these have been replaced by the Cell and Type functions in Excel.

But one piece of information that Cell and Type can’t tell you is whether your cell or cells contain formulas vs values and sometimes this is a very handy thing to know at a glance. For example, if you build a spreadsheet using formulas to estimate amounts; but then start to drop in values as more concrete information becomes available.

In this situation I like to format cells containing formulas differently from the cells containing values, so that I can see at a glance where my estimates are. Its’ handy to have the formatting change automatically, so I don’t have to remember what my rules are weeks or months later.

This is where Get.Cell shines. The syntax I’m going to use is

=GET.CELL(48,A1) – where A1 is the cell I’m going to reference.

The trick here is that Get.Cell is NOT entered in a cell, but instead as a named formula. After creating the named formula, I can reference it while applying conditional formatting. In this way, when the type of content in the cell changes the conditional formatting automatically updates.

Using a named formula in Conditional Formatting - dialog box
Using a named formula in Conditional Formatting

Where does one find information about the Get.Cell function? Not from Microsoft or at least not easily from Microsoft.

Try this post https://www.mrexcel.com/forum/excel-questions/20611-info-only-get-cell-arguments.html   to see the possible switches for Get.Cell



Outlook – Retrieve Dismissed Reminders

Some days, your biggest enemy is yourself.  Have you ever hit that “Dismiss All” button, or accidentally dismissed a reminder you wanted to keep?

Reminder Dialog box with highlighted Dismiss All button
Oops! I hit the Dismiss All button!

Here’s how to find that reminder, so that you can reset it.

Use the search, but instead of searching by topic, type in modified:<date>

Highlighted Search bar
Use the Search bar in the calendar view
Close up of search entry
Close up of search entry

Use the date when you accidentally dismissed those reminders (causing the modification). Your view will automatically switch into the Search Tools view. If you have multiple calendars you want to search (as I do) make sure the All Calendar Items button is pressed.

Closeup of the Search Tools view
Closeup of the Search Tools view

It will show you all the reminders you’ve modified.

In fact, you don’t need to be too precise about dates. Here’s an example, where only the name of the month was typed in.

Still works!

Search by the month name if you don't know what date.
Search by the month name if you don’t know what date.

You can then reopen the item and reset the reminder.

Fixing an annoyance in Outlook 2010

The scenario:

You like to flag your mail for Follow Up on a specific day. But Outlook always defaults to setting the reminder at the end of the day. Can this be changed to the beginning of the day?

It makes sense that if you want a reminder set for Today, that the default time for that flag is set to one hour before the end of your work day (as defined in your Calendar settings).

It makes sense that flagging a reminder for one of the pre-defined future dates (Tomorrow, This Week or Next Week) uses the start of your work day as the default time.

It makes NO SENSE that flagging a Custom date reminder reverts the default time to one hour before the end of the work day.

To change this default to the start of your work day.

Finding the Quick Click menu
Finding the Quick Click menu

Click on the drop-down arrow on the Follow Up button on the Home Ribbon.

Select Quick Click

The Quick Click dialog box
The Quick Click dialog

The Set Quick Click dialog appears. Choose Tomorrow as the default. Click the OK button.

Done. Future custom reminder times will now default to the start of the work day – not the end.